Roads

Comparing our performance

Service overview

Roads and lighting services across North Lanarkshire are delivered by pdf icon Amey Public Services [2Mb], an LLP (limited liability partnership) partnership between North Lanarkshire Council, Amey Local Government and a broad range of private contractors.

This covers the maintenance of over 1,500 kilometres of roads, 350 bridges, and 60,000 lighting columns.  The fleet of 110 vehicles includes 30 gritters and 35 snowploughs and there are over 2,000 salt bins and three salt barns within the council area.  Priority gritting routes cover 56% of North Lanarkshire's roads.

Ongoing maintenance work on North Lanarkshire's roads and lighting includes:

  • improving roads with surface dressing patching
  • renewing roads with resurfacing techniques
  • re-building badly damaged roads
  • painting road markings
  • maintaining gullys
  • temporary and permanent pothole repairs
  • implementation of a high efficiency, lighting replacement scheme
  • ensuring community safety through new lighting
  • reducing energy use and light pollution

The 24-hour winter maintenance service runs from 1 October to 15 May each year, and provides the following services during the winter months:

  • proactive and reactive gritting services on a network of priority routes
  • monitoring weather forecasts through our specialist suppliers
  • experienced operatives on standby 24/7 during winter months

Further information regarding the roads and lighting service can be found on our website:

The council also works with a range of partners through the Community Safety Partnership (which includes Police Scotland, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, and Amey Public Services) to keep people safe on our roads safe and continue to reduce the number of people killed or seriously injured.  This work contributes towards the Scottish Government targets to reduce the number of deaths and injuries on roads by 2020 and our work includes:

  • Implementing various road safety measures including upgrades to puffin crossings and installation of signals, traffic calming, reduced speed limits, and mini roundabouts.
  • Delivering many educational programmes to help keep our children safe on the roads.
  • Expanding the new driver initiative to secondary schools and colleges and continuing work with schools in terms of cycle training and the junior road safety officer scheme, bikeability and child pedestrian training and school travel plans.
  • Continuing to engage with young people aged 16-18 through the cut it out road traffic awareness programme, which focuses on the effects of behaviours in drivers and passengers.  
  • Promoting key road safety messages using campaigns and events, including visits to health centres and community facilities and use of social media. 

Further road safety information can be found on our website:

The following performance information represents a subset of North Lanarkshire's performance in terms of roads maintenance; this represents the performance measure that can be compared across all councils in Scotland through the Local Government Benchmarking Framework (LGBF).  This makes reference to our family group, the councils with whom our performance is most comparable in terms of demographic conditions.  Our family group for roads comprises eight of the most densely populated council areas in Scotland, these councils are Aberdeen City Council, Dundee City Council, East Dunbartonshire Council, City of Edinburgh Council, Falkirk Council, Glasgow City Council, West Dunbartonshire Council, and North Lanarkshire Council.

Council performance

Roads maintenance

The following indicators show the percentage of the road network that should be considered for maintenance treatment based on output from the Society of Chief Officers of Transportation in Scotland (SCOTS) Scottish Road Maintenance Condition Survey.

Roads within North Lanarkshire Council are surveyed as part of a national programme. This survey collects various characteristics of the road condition.  The survey outputs identify those roads that should be considered for maintenance treatment. Using this data as a starting point councils carry out more detailed investigation and plan their programme of works having considered other factors such as impact on spending provision, user delays, and safety concerns.

The series of surveys identifies four classifications of roads to be considered for maintenance treatment: A, B, C, and unclassified.  A summary of performance in each classification is noted below.

A class roads

IndicatorActual 2009/11Actual 2010/12Actual 2011/13Actual 2012/14Actual 2013/15Actual 2014/16
% of A roads that should be considered for maintenance treatment in North Lanarkshire28.6%25.1%22.8%22.2%22.5%22.7%
Scotland comparisons30.3%30.5%29.4%28.7%29.0%29.0%
Family group comparisons27.8%28.3%26.0%24.3%25.3%24.8%
  • A class roads are major roads which deliver the basic road links to certain areas or communities.  All A class roads are surveyed in both directions every two years.
  • The latest series of surveys shows continued improvement in the maintenance of our A class roads, as 22.7% of our A class roads should be considered for maintenance treatment.  This proportion is lower and better than comparisons with Scotland and family group averages and is amongst the lowest in the family group which comprises eight of the more densely populated urban council areas.

B class roads

IndicatorActual 2009/11Actual 2010/12Actual 2011/13Actual 2012/14Actual 2013/15Actual 2014/16
% of B roads that should be considered for maintenance treatment in North Lanarkshire30.3%27.8%27.2%27.3%28.4%27.8%
Scotland comparisons35.8%36.3%35.0%35.2%36.1%34.8%
Family group comparisons27.9%27.0%26.5%27.8%27.3%25.8%
  • B class roads are roads which serve a local purpose and connect to strategic routes.  50% of B class roads are surveyed in both directions every four years.
  • The latest series of surveys shows 27.8% of our B class roads should be considered for maintenance treatment.  This proportion is better than comparisons with the average for Scotland, but is slightly higher than our family group average.

C class roads

IndicatorActual 2009/11Actual 2010/12Actual 2011/13Actual 2012/14Actual 2013/15Actual 2014/16
% of C roads that should be considered for maintenance treatment in North Lanarkshire31.2%29.4%28.1%28.3%29.5%29.6%
Scotland comparisons35.0%36.0%34.8%36.6%37.4%34.7%
Family group comparisons29.5%28.9%28.5%29.6%29.5%26.6%
  • C class roads are mainly rural inter-connecting roads.  50% of C class roads are surveyed in both directions every four years.
  • The latest series of surveys shows 29.6% of our C class roads should be considered for maintenance treatment.  This proportion is better than comparisons with Scotland.

Unclassified roads

IndicatorActual 2009/11Actual 2010/12Actual 2011/13Actual 2012/14Actual 2013/15Actual 2014/16
% of unclassified roads that should be considered for maintenance treatment in North Lanarkshire35.2%33.6%35.2%34.9%36.3%36.7%
Scotland comparisons41.9%38.3%40.1%39.4%39.3%40.1%
Family group comparisons36.0%36.0%36.0%35.7%35.3%35.6%
  • 10% of unclassified roads are surveyed in one direction every six years - this lower frequency reflects the lesser volume of traffic carried on unclassified roads.
  • The latest series of surveys shows 36.7% of our unclassified roads should be considered for maintenance treatment.  This proportion is better than comparisons with the average for Scotland, but is slightly higher than our family group average.

Cost of maintaining roads

The following indicator measures the cost of maintaining roads per kilometres of length.  This compares the distance of roads maintained and the cost of expenditure on roads and winter maintenance.  The condition of roads within each local authority area can be affected by factors such as budgetary constraints, traffic flows/usage, and weather patterns.

Gross maintenance costs include all expenditure and income relating to roads and transport.

IndicatorActual 2010/11Actual 2011/12Actual 2012/13Actual 2013/14Actual 2014/15Actual 2015/16
road and winter maintenance gross expenditure in North Lanarkshire£31,365£27,036£25,959£23,441£22,833£21,253
kilometre of roads in North Lanarkshire1,566 km1,568.2 km1,566.6 km1,603.8 km1,604.7 km1603.7 km
cost of maintenance per kilometre of roads in North Lanarkshire£20,029£17,240£16,570£14,616£14,229£13,252
Scotland comparisons£12,955£11,779£11,537£11,092£10,307£10,791
Family group comparisons£29,483£25,475£23,599£22,521£20,402£21,480
  • The latest costs for the maintenance per kilometre of roads in North Lanarkshire (£13,252) show a reduction from previous years which is in line with the national trend.
  • Although costs are above the national average, a number of factors could impact on this, such as the inclusion of winter maintenance costs which will vary considerably across councils.
  • In addition, comparison with councils across Scotland can be misleading, in particular when considering North Lanarkshire is an urban area the heavier volume and density of traffic has a greater impact on wear and tear of the road network than a council in a rural area.  This will naturally have an impact on road maintenance costs per kilometre.  Average costs for our family group, comprising eight of the more densely populated council areas, are a more comparable figure (£21,480); within our urban family group, our costs are below average.
  • Over the five year period (2010/11 to 2015/16) gross expenditure on roads maintenance has declined in many council areas, with a decrease of 32.2% in North Lanarkshire compared to a drop of 15.5% for Scotland overall, and 23.8% for the family group.
  • However, comparison of costs is not necessarily an appropriate measure of performance as councils include differing elements of roads maintenance costs in their calculations.
  • In addition, this indicator does not take into consideration capital expenditure on the road network.  Reducing costs are not necessarily an indicator of improvement as higher costs may reflect the council's decision to invest in the asset.

What the council is doing to improve services

Work is ongoing to ensure the continued maintenance of our roads and lighting services, current priorities include:

  • Completing the review of traffic regulation orders in town centres, this will ensure more efficient, safe access to town centres for all traffic including pedestrians.
  • Improving the management and provision of parking in town centres and park and ride.
  • Investing in cycling and walking infrastructure to provide alternative forms of access to places of work and learning and enhance facilities for healthy recreational pursuits.
  • Continuing redevelopment work with the M8/74 Raith Interchange contractors to improve the national roads infrastructure in North Lanarkshire.
  • Continuing work with Network Rail on the Edinburgh to Glasgow (rail) improvement programme and other rail initiatives to deliver national infrastructure in North Lanarkshire, enhancing multi-modal travel options both within the council area and to other destinations beyond the council boundary.
  • Further developing the Roads Asset Management Plan (RAMP), which will be reviewed every five years.  This will ensure effective use of budgets and resources.
  • Continuing to target the capital investment programme to improve carriageways, footpaths, signing, lighting, and structures.
  • Maintaining and improving the road conditions by targeting budgets and resources and using appropriate maintenance systems.
  • Implementing the use of eForms to allow residents and businesses to make requests online.

In addition, work is ongoing through our Community Safety Partnership to improve road safety and reduce road casualties throughout North Lanarkshire; this includes:

  • Campaigns to educate road users on their behaviour and enforce legislation to keep people safe on our roads.
  • Delivery of the Cut it Out road traffic awareness programme - following development of the course content, 12 instructors are now available to ensure future delivery continuity.
  • Installation of targeted road safety engineering and enforcement measures throughout North Lanarkshire to reduce the number of fatal and serious casualties.
  • Work with Roads Scotland on road safety campaigns targeting all primary schools in North Lanarkshire.
  • Road safety educational and encouragement initiatives targeted at vulnerable road users.

How the public can get involved

  • For any queries, or further details regarding the performance information on this page, please contact the Business Solutions team.
  • For service specific matters, members of the public can provide feedback at most of our venues or through our comments and compliments web forms.
  • To contribute to the future of local services, residents can .

Further information

Local councils provide a wide range of services for their communities; the online data tool, My Local Council, provides further information and comparisons on these services to show how councils across Scotland are performing

For North Lanarkshire, however, the above provides only a snapshot of our performance; the full range of  performance information available from our website provides a more complete picture of the performance we have achieved during 2015/16.

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