Pupils show healthy appetite for Fair Trade

Schools support Fair Trade

Berryhill fairtrade

Pupils at Berryhill Primary School in Wishaw and Buchanan High School in Coatbridge have been busy supporting Fair Trade as part of a programme to learn more about the benefits to farmers and their families in the developing world.

Representatives from one of the largest fruit and vegetable wholesalers and suppliers to schools, George Carruthers and Sons, visited the schools to give pupils the chance to taste fair trade produce and find out more about how Fairtrade assists farmers, workers, producers, their families and communities through receiving better deals and using methods that encourage sustainability.

The visits were part of a programme of activity in an effort to achieve Fair Trade zone status in North Lanarkshire - which once achieved, will contribute to making Scotland a fair trade nation.

The Fair Trade movement was established to ensure producers are paid a fair price and offered an opportunity to participate in global markets without exploitation.

Kate Ralston, Teacher at Berryhill PS said: "The school has a Fairtrade committee set up and get involved in tuck shops during Fairtrade fortnight. We also have a nurture group and are planning to offer them Fairtrade hot chocolate and toast and banana during January and February. They use the profits to purchase more products and then buy things the school's needs.

"We are committed to ensuring all our pupils are responsible citizens and effective contributors. We want to encourage pupils' understanding of their wider environment and how their actions can improve the quality of life in the developing countries through fair international trade."

9G1Y3406 John Kennedy, Head of Social Subjects at Buchanan HS added: "Within the school we have a Fairtrade committee who organise our Fairtrade coffee shop and tuck shop during Fairtrade fortnight.  We are also proud to have Fairtrade as part of our modern studies course.

"We are committed to ensuring all our pupils are responsible citizens and effective contributors. We want to encourage pupils' understanding of their wider environment and how their actions can improve the quality of life in the developing countries through fair international trade."

To become a fair trade zone, some shops, restaurants and bars need to sell fair trade products. Charities, clubs, social groups, societies, churches and faith groups are encouraged to use fair trade products when they meet, as are businesses while at work.

John McDonald, Chair of the North Lanarkshire Fairtrade Steering Group said: "We have power in our hands to make choices that help others to have better lives. Fair trade challenges people to think about the source of goods we buy and we can all make a difference here in North Lanarkshire."

Earlier this year, the council pledge support to a new fair trade charter which will urge local retailers and businesses to provide Fair Trade options for people living and working in North Lanarkshire.

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